REPORT ALL SUSPICIOUS OR CRIMINAL ACTIVITY TO 911

Saturday, December 9, 2017

FENTANYL- Fake Xanax Pills Reported with Fentanyl


Snohomish Overdose Prevention on Facebook is warning the public about counterfeit Xanax pills that the Snohomish Regional Drug and Gang Task Force reports seeing in Snohomish County.








 Fentanyl is an extremely potent opioid that can cause an overdose or death in small amounts.






Symptoms of a fentanyl overdose include pinpoint pupils, weak muscles, dizziness, confusion, extreme sleepiness, loss of consciousness, profoundly slowed heartbeat, very low blood pressure, dangerously slowed or stopped breathing, bluish tint to nails and lips.

If you discover someone who you suspect of a fentanyl overdose call 911 immediately. If naloxone is available, apply a dose. More than one dose may be needed to reverse the effects of fentanyl.

The Snohomish Regional Drug and Gang Task Force has been expecting fentanyl to show up in Snohomish County due to its presence in the rest of the U.S. and British Columbia. The task force’s observations demonstrates that fentanyl has arrived in the county.







Snohomish Overdose Prevention:


San Francisco Health Network:


National Institute on Drug Abuse:


Drugabuse.com:



Monday, December 4, 2017

SNOHOMISH COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE- Crime Prevention Newsletter


The Sheriff’s Office has posted the latest issue of its crime prevention newsletter “Partners in Crime Prevention.” This issue has tips on preventing package theft, protecting your identity during this holiday season, etc.

To see the issue, go to,

Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office:



OPIOID CRISIS- Washington State’s Response Part 7


The Washington State Attorney General’s Office, Washington State Patrol and the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys have issued a 29-page report with seven recommended goals to reduce illegal opioid use.

The seventh and final goal is to expand access to treatment. It recommends support and expanded statewide and local non-traditional law enforcement approaches, such as drug courts, Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion, and embedded social workers.

This goal looks at opioid addiction more as a disease than just a criminal justice problem. As a disease opioid addiction needs treatment. The report points out that there is a shortage of treatment services in Washington State for people entering and leaving the criminal justice system. It also says that there is a shortage in “aftercare” services such as connecting people in recovery to housing and employment.

It points to a 2016 U.S. Surgeon General report that “…nationally just ten percent of Americans facing drug addiction obtain treatment, in part due to limited availability and affordability of services.”








The report encourages continuation of drug courts to use treatment as an alternative to sentencing and supervision when possible. The principle of drug courts "is that treating participants' underlying substance abuse disorder can lower recidivism." Snohomish County has a Family Drug Treatment Court, an Adult Drug Treatment Court and a Juvenile Offender Drug Treatment Court.

Local law enforcement agencies can also help guide opioid addicts toward treatment. In King County the Law Enforcement Assisted Diversion (LEAD) program diverts people arrested for low-level, non-violent offenses, such as drug possession, minor property crimes, prostitution, etc., into drug treatment and support services instead of into the court system. In Snohomish County, the both the city of Everett and the Snohomish County Sheriff’s Office embeds social workers with police officers in its Everett Police Community Outreach and Enforcement Team and the Sheriff’s Office’s Office of Neighborhood’s Homeless Outreach team who find treatment for willing and qualifying homeless.



For the complete report, go to,

Washington State Attorney General’s Office:




The first goal is to increase public awareness about the dangers of opioids (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states-response.html).

The second goal is to prevent addiction by curtailing overprescribing (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html).

The third goal is to reduce the illicit use of prescription opioids http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states_30.html.

The fourth goal is to disrupt and dismantle organizations responsible for trafficking narcotics  http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/12/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html

The fifth goal is to prevent further increases in overdose deaths from fentanyl


The sixth goal is to improve overdose reporting and information sharing http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/12/opioid-crisis-washington-states_3.html






Sunday, December 3, 2017

OPIOID CRISIS- Washington State’s Response Part 6

The Washington State Attorney General’s Office, Washington State Patrol and the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys have issued a 29-page report with seven recommended goals to reduce illegal opioid use.

The sixth goal is to improve overdose reporting and information sharing. It has three recommendations,

1.      Direct resources toward more timely analysis of samples at the Washington State Toxicology Laboratory.

2.      Require emergency medical service providers to report patient care information, including treatment of overdoses.

3.      Require law enforcement officers to report naloxone administrations.

Data is important to analyzing any situation. Real-time overdose data can help public-health and public safety organizations respond to drug overdose patterns as they happen and to refine their intervention efforts.

Some states have centralized data clearinghouses to collect and disseminate overdose information to law enforcement, treatment and prevention organizations. Currently, the Washington State Toxicology Laboratory within the Washington State Patrol analyzes drug overdose information. It has seen a significant increase in the number of cases submitted for testing. However, there is no centralized statewide testing system in Washington, nor are there requirements for reporting of overdoses by all entities that might be involved with an overdose.



Beginning in July of this year, state legislation requires emergency departments to report overdoses to the state Department of Health (DOH) in real-time. However, as valuable as this information is, the DOH does not receive information about overdoses from emergency medical service providers (fire department EMT’s, etc.) or from local law enforcement.

The report believes that the reporting and testing of drug overdose information should be conducted in real time and should also include emergency medical service providers and law enforcement.


For the complete report, go to,
Washington State Attorney General’s Office:
http://agportal-s3bucket.s3.amazonaws.com/uploadedfiles/Another/News/Press_Releases/OpioidSummitReport.pdf

The first goal is to increase public awareness about the dangers of opioids (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states-response.html).

The second goal is to prevent addiction by curtailing overprescribing (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html).

The third goal is to reduce the illicit use of prescription opioids http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states_30.html.

The fourth goal is to disrupt and dismantle organizations responsible for trafficking narcotics http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/12/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html

The fifth goal is to prevent further increases in overdose deaths from fentanyl
http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/12/opioid-crisis-washington-states_2.html


Saturday, December 2, 2017

OPIOID CRISIS- Washington State’s Response Part 5


The Washington State Attorney General’s Office, Washington State Patrol and the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys have issued a 29-page report with seven recommended goals to reduce illegal opioid use.

The fifth goal wants to prevent further increases in overdose deaths from fentanyl. Its recommendation is to adopt enhanced criminal penalties for trafficking of fentanyl and fentanyl analogues.

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid which can be deadly in small doses. In the Seattle area, fentanyl has been found in what looks like prescription pills that have been purchased illicitly. In other parts of the country, fentanyl has been added to low-grade batches of heroin which is sold as more a potent drug to increase the drug pusher’s profits. When drugs are adulterated with fentanyl the buyers do not know how much fentanyl is in the drug or even if there is fentanyl at all.








A May 2017 study from the Washington State Department of Health (“Fentanyl Overdose Deaths in Washington State”) concluded that there was an increase of fentanyl-related overdose deaths in Washington State between 2015 (28) and 2016 (70).

The Attorney General/Washington State Patrol/Association of Prosecuting Attorney’s report notes that some states have enhanced penalties for drug dealers who have added fentanyl to heroin or other drugs. The report recommends that trafficking fentanyl or fentanyl analogues be added to state law as an aggravating circumstance to allow sentences above the standard range.



For the complete report, go to,

Washington State Attorney General’s Office:






The first goal is to increase public awareness about the dangers of opioids (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states-response.html).



The second goal is to prevent addiction by curtailing overprescribing (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html).



The third goal is to reduce the illicit use of prescription opioids http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states_30.html.



The fourth goal is to disrupt and dismantle organizations responsible for trafficking narcotics http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/12/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html




Friday, December 1, 2017

OPIOID CRISIS- Washington State’s Response Part 4


The Washington State Attorney General’s Office, Washington State Patrol and the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys have issued a 29-page report with seven recommended goals to reduce illegal opioid use.

So far, the report’s recommendations have called on actions by medical and dental professionals, government entities such as DSHS, and the public.

The fourth goal focuses on law enforcement actions to “interdict” the illicit drug trade. The goal is to disrupt and dismantle drug trafficking organizations responsible for bringing narcotics into our state. Under this goal the report has one recommendation, restore resources for multi-jurisdictional drug-gang task forces.

The report notes that multi-jurisdictional drug task forces work to reduce illicit drugs in the community. It highlights recent results from task forces in Grant County and Grays Harbor County.

Drug-gang task forces are federally, and state funded. State funding has declined from $1.6 million in 2006 to $0 starting in 2015, 2016 and 2017. Federal funding has had its ups and downs since 2000. In 2010, Washington State task forces received $6.6 million, while between 2011 through 2017 Washington State task forces received a yearly average of just over $3 million.

Three task forces have disbanded bringing the total of task forces in Washington to 17. Other task forces have limited their operations to match reduced budgets.

Snohomish County has two multi-agency drug task forces, the Snohomish Regional Drug and Gang Task Force and the South Snohomish County Narcotics Task Force.





For the complete report, go to,

Washington State Attorney General’s Office:




The first goal is to increase public awareness about the dangers of opioids (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states-response.html).



The second goal is to prevent addiction by curtailing overprescribing (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html).



The third goal is to reduce the illicit use of prescription opioids http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states_30.html.


Thursday, November 30, 2017

OPIOID CRISIS- Washington State’s Response Part 3


The Washington State Attorney General’s Office, Washington State Patrol and the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys have issued a 29-page report with seven recommended goals to reduce illegal opioid use.

The third goal is to reduce the illicit use of prescription opioids. The report has four recommendations under this goal,



1.      Require providers to consult the Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) before prescribing certain controlled substances.

2.      Eliminate paper prescriptions.

3.      Create a statewide medicine take-back system.

4.      Enable investigators in Washington’s Medicaid Fraud Control Unit to be appointed as limited authority peace officer for Medicaid fraud investigations.

Two of the major sources of non-medical use of opioids are from doctors and friends or family.





One way to feed an addiction or to sell opioids is to go “doctor shopping,” that is to visit multiple doctors or to fill prescriptions at multiple pharmacies. The state maintains a Prescription Monitoring Program (PMP) database that is updated by pharmacists when they fill prescriptions for certain controlled substances. The database can be accessed by medical providers to identify patients who may be receiving too many opioids or dangerous combinations of medications. Currently, medical providers are not required to look up a patient’s record in the PMP database. The report would like a requirement that requires medical providers look up their patients in the database.

Prescriptions on paper lends themselves to forgery. From April 2015 to early August 2017, healthcare providers reported 86 incidents of fraudulent opioid prescriptions or stolen pads to the Pharmacy Quality Assurance Commission. Electronic prescribing of prescriptions allows for a more secure method of communication between a doctor and a pharmacy.

While Snohomish County and King County have medicine take-back programs, all counties in the state do not provide a way for citizens to dispose of medicines that are no longer needed. More than half of teens say that it is easy to get prescription drugs from medicine cabinets at home. Having an easy, well-advertised way for the public to dispose of unneeded prescriptions should help to prevent the family medicine cabinet from becoming an easy drug diversion source.

The Medicaid Fraud Control Unit (MFCU) is part of the Washington State Attorney General’s Office. It investigates Medicaid fraud within the state, but must rely heavily on local law enforcement agencies to carry out key investigative tasks such as issuing search warrants and making arrests. The report points out that the vast majority of MFCU’s in other states have the authority of limited authority peace officers. The report believes that this limited authority would greatly help in Medicaid fraud investigations and in reducing diversion of opioids.

Next post, part 4; disrupt and dismantle drug trafficking organizations responsible for bringing narcotics into out state.



For the complete report, go to,

Washington State Attorney General’s Office:




The first goal is to increase public awareness about the dangers of opioids (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states-response.html).



The second goal is to prevent addiction by curtailing overprescribing (http://ssnoccrimewatch.blogspot.com/2017/11/opioid-crisis-washington-states.html).